Skip Navigation LinksBlog

The Wrong Approach to Disease Prevention

The Wrong Approach to Disease Prevention

I recently read an article in the New York Times by H.Gilbert Welch a professor of medicine at the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice who is also the author of "Overdiagnosed: Making People Sick in the Pursuit of Health".  The article is reproduced below.

I thought that it was a well written article which raises some issues that we should all be thinking about, particularly when we talk about prevention of disease.

Different people think about prevention in different ways.  For example, many of us think that prevention is all about ensuring that we eat a nutrient dense diet, avoid processed foods wherever possible, use high quality supplements, exercise regularly, have good sleeping habits and avoid damaging lifestyles such as smoking or excessive alcohol consumption.

Then other people think that prevention is all about going to the Doctor regularly and having check-ups and screening for early signs of potential diseases, even though that they are feeling OK at the time.

Mr Welch's article outlines his concerns about relying on the latter approach.  He feels with justification that the medical profession has to a large degree moved towards taking people who are well and often making them sick as a result of intervention from diagnosis screening…which can often be wrong.  What is interesting and why he is against this increase in screening is that at the end of the day it seems to provide minimal benefits and has the capacity to do harm and the energy of the profession seems to be moving more to making healthy people sick rather than the other way around.

He cites a report by the National Cancer Institute in which it was established that early screening for prostate cancer did not improve mortality rates, but in the process of treatment many men suffered incontinence or impotence for little upside.

It may be that you don’t agree with everything that he says, but one point he makes is indisputable, and that is we cannot look to the medical profession to make us healthy…that is the individual responsibility of each of us.

Here is the article.

If You Feel O.K., Maybe You Are O.K.

By H. GILBERT WELCH  Published: February 27, 2012

EARLY diagnosis has become one of the most fundamental precepts of modern medicine. It goes something like this: The best way to keep people healthy is to find out if they have (pick one) heart disease, autism, glaucoma, diabetes, vascular problems, osteoporosis or, of course, cancer — early. And the way to find these conditions early is through screening.

It is a precept that resonates with the intuition of the general public: obviously it’s better to catch and deal with problems as soon as possible. A study published with much fanfare in The New England Journal of Medicine last week contained what researchers called the best evidence yet that colonoscopies reduce deaths from colon cancer.

Recently, however, there have been rumblings within the medical profession that suggest that the enthusiasm for early diagnosis may be waning. Most prominent are recommendations against prostate cancer screening for healthy men and for reducing the frequency of breast and cervical cancer screening. Some experts even cautioned against the recent colonoscopy results, pointing out that the study participants were probably much healthier than the general population, which would make them less likely to die of colon cancer. In addition there is a concern about too much detection and treatment of early diabetes, a growing appreciation that autism has been too broadly defined and skepticism toward new guidelines for universal cholesterol screening of children.

The basic strategy behind early diagnosis is to encourage the well to get examined — to determine if they are not, in fact, sick. But is looking hard for things to be wrong a good way to promote health? The truth is, the fastest way to get heart disease, autism, glaucoma, diabetes, vascular problems, osteoporosis or cancer ... is to be screened for it. In other words, the problem is over-diagnosis and overtreatment.

Screening the apparently healthy potentially saves a few lives (although the National Cancer Institute couldn’t find any evidence for this in its recent large studies of prostate and ovarian cancer screening). But it definitely drags many others into the system needlessly — into needless appointments, needless tests, needless drugs and needless operations (not to mention all the accompanying needless insurance forms).

This process doesn’t promote health; it promotes disease. People suffer from more anxiety about their health, from drug side effects, from complications of surgery. A few die. And remember: these people felt fine when they entered the health care system.

It wasn’t always like this. In the past, doctors made diagnoses and initiated therapy only in patients who were experiencing problems. Of course, we still do that today. But increasingly we also operate under the early diagnosis precept: seeking diagnosis and initiating therapy in people who are not experiencing problems. That’s a huge change in approach, from one that focused on the sick to one that focuses on the well.

Think about it this way: in the past, you went to the doctor because you had a problem and you wanted to learn what to do about it. Now you go to the doctor because you want to stay well and you learn instead that you have a problem.

How did we get here? Or perhaps, more to the point: Who is to blame? One answer is the health care industry: By turning people into patients, screening makes a lot of money for pharmaceutical companies, hospitals and doctors. The chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society once pointed out that his hospital could make around $5,000 from each free prostate cancer screening, thanks to the ensuing biopsies, treatments and follow-up care.

A more glib response to the question of blame is: Richard Nixon. It was Nixon who said, “we need to work out a system that includes a greater emphasis on preventive care.” Preventive care was central to his administration’s promotion of health maintenance organizations and the war on cancer. But because the promotion of genuine health — largely dependent upon a healthy diet, exercise and not smoking — did not fit well in the biomedical culture, preventive care was transformed into a high-tech search for early disease.

Some doctors have long recognized that the approach is a distraction for the medical community. It’s easier to transform people into new patients than it is to treat the truly sick. It’s easier to develop new ways of testing than it is to develop better treatments. And it’s a lot easier to measure how many healthy people get tested than it is to determine how well doctors manage the chronically ill.

But the precept of early diagnosis was too intuitive, too appealing, too hard to challenge and too easy to support. The rumblings show that that’s beginning to change.

Let me be clear: early diagnosis is not always wrong. Doctors would rather see patients early in the course of their heart attack than wait until they develop low blood pressure and an irregular heartbeat. And we’d rather see women with small breast lumps than wait until they develop large breast masses. The question is how often and how far we should get ahead of symptoms.

For years now, people have been encouraged to look to medical care as the way to make them healthy. But that’s your job — you can’t contract that out. Doctors might be able to help, but so might an author of a good cookbook, a personal trainer, a cleric or a good friend. We would all be better off if the medical system got a little closer to its original mission of helping sick patients, and let the healthy be.

Comments  (1)

  • Prof.Devidas
    March 01, 2012

    I am of the view that an integrated system of medical knowledge is what is to be imparted to a person who wishes to be in health care delivery service. Ayurveda has wonderful methods for healing the body in a manner that is assistive of the body's natural healing power.. So also there are wonderful healing methods in Unani and Siddha systems. Homeopathy itself was a reaction to the allopathic system om medication and discovered the minimum dose of a single substance that restored the health of the whole body. With current advances in scientific knowledge of the human body and the regenerative and restorative properties of herbs, it is perhaps logical that the western system of allopathic medicine should no longer be allowed to say that it is alone THE healing system. Human rights dimensions require a holistic approach to human health and the preventive aspects especially though the health giving aspects of food items, fruits and vegetables included, will have to receive greater attention. The state has a significant role to play in preventing harmful items being made available.

    Sincerely,
    Prof.Devidas.

Leave a comment

  •    
     
     
     
     
       
  • Your privacy is important to us, please read our privacy statement .


  •  

Shop

Connect With Us
Customer Information
Company

All material provided within this website is for informational and educational purposes only, and is not to be construed as medical advice or instruction. No action should be taken solely on the contents of this website. Consult your physician or a qualified health professional on any matters regarding your health and wellbeing or on any opinions expressed within this website. The information provided in our newsletters and special reports is believed to be accurate based on the best judgment of the Company and the authors. However, the reader is responsible for consulting with their own health professional on any matters raised within. Neither the company nor the author/s of any information provided accept responsibility for the actions or consequential results of any action taken by any reader.

TRUSTe online privacy certification
McAfee Secure sites help keep you safe from identity theft, credit card fraud, spyware, spam, viruses and online scams

© 1999-2014 Xtend-Life . All rights reserved.